1st International Summer School on Human Factors in Software Engineering

Summer School Postponed due to COVID-19

In the light of the recent global outbreak of COVID-19 and the current travel restrictions that have affected many universities as well as our industry partners, we have decided to postpone the Summer School on Human Factors in Software Engineering until the fall 2020 (preliminary). We are deeply sorry and apologize for the inconvenience this might cause, but we believe that the health and well-being of all attendees is of the highest priority, same as the inclusiveness of our event, which at this point we cannot guarantee.

We are currently considering the new dates in October-November. The final decision will be taken when the global situation will brighten, hopefully before the summer. If the situation will not improve, we will consider cancelling this year’s school and instead invite those interested to attend the same event next summer.

While the application deadline will be delayed, we welcome interested applicants to contact us at their earliest convenience. The application system will remain open.

The 1st International Summer School on Human Factors in Software Engineering will bring together internationally recognised scholars to discuss advanced topics on human factors in software engineering. The main goal of the summer school is to provide a contribution to Ph.D. students and academic and industrial researchers alike on latest findings in the field of human factors in software engineering. A particular focus will be set on research methods in that field.

Aim: The main aim of the summer school is to provide a contribution to Ph.D. students and academic and industrial researchers alike on latest findings in the field of human factors in software engineering. A particular focus will be set on research methods in that field.

Target group: The summer school is primarily intended for Ph.D. students working in the area of behavioural software engineering and/or studying the influence of human factors in software engineering.

Organisation and structure: The school is organised in four days including lectures, practical lab sessions, an on-site visit at our company partner Ericsson, and a doctoral symposium. Upon completion, the participating students will receive a certificate with the statement of credited work equivalent to 3 ECTS. Details on the program can be taken from here.

Language: English.

Previous knowledge: Participants are expected to be working in the area, independent whether they are early or late in their studies. However, we also welcome students interested in the subject but not necessarily working in the field. The lectures will equip the students with the knowledge needed for the practical lab sessions, which will be also supervised.

Conditions: To be accepted to the summer school, those applying are expected to submit an ongoing or recently completed work for the doctoral symposium together with the registration.

Speakers: We are proud to announce the following speakers’ confirmation:

Klaas-Jan Stol

Dr Klaas-Jan Stol is a lecturer with the School of Computer Science and Information Technology at University College Cork. He is a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) Principal Investigator, and an SFI Funded Investigator with Lero, the Irish Software Research Centre. His research focuses on contemporary software engineering strategies and research methodology. Stol received a Ph.D. from the University of Limerick and a M.Sc. from the University of Groningen.

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Albrecht Schmidt

Albrecht Schmidt is a professor of computer science at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München and holds a chair in Human-Centered Ubiquitous Media. 

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Magne Jørgensen

Magne Jørgensen is a chief research scientist at Simula Metropolitan, professor of informatics at Oslo Metropolitan University, adjunct professor at University of Oslo and advisor for Scienta. His areas of specialization are evidence-based software engineering, project management, time and cost estimation, and processes for judgment and decision-making under uncertainty. Magne Jørgensen is a member of the national digitalization board for governmental projects in Norway.

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Nicole Novielli

Nicole Novielli is an Assistant Professor at the University of Bari, where she received a Ph.D. in Computer Science in 2010. Her research interests lie at the intersection of software engineering and affective computing with a specific focus on sentiment analysis of developers’ communication traces and emotion detection based on biometrics. In 2016, she started the workshop series on Emotion Awareness in Software Engineering co-located with the International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE). She was the principal investigator of the three-year project 'EmoQuest - Investigating the Role of Emotions in Online Question and Answering Sites', funded by MIUR under the SIR (Scientific Independence of young Researchers) program.

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